Processing
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CARVEL’ / Baby Behold – Music video by Cyrill Studer

Created by Basel (CH) based visual designer Cyrill Studer for “Baby Behold” by the band Carvel’, is a collection of computer generated graphics that accompany the music in a subtle but clever and engaging way.

The song, released on May 5th, 2017, is a straight forward, electronic bundle which captivates the listener through its simplicity as well as its catchy and carefully produced arrangements. With that in mind the video attempts to embed the song in a visual world where its qualities can emerge. The visual concept of the whole video is based on one single form. The ellipse. By showing it from different angles and in varying number of entities images were achieved which rather seem complex considering it originating from an ellipse. The inspiration for the vintage look of the visuals came from the aesthetics of computer graphics in their early days which match the rough and electronic sounds of the song pretty well.

The graphics were generated entirely in Processing, manually controlled and performed with a midi controller and recorded through the Syphon with the Syphon Recorder. Premiere Pro was used for cutting and After Effects to edit the image in post in order the achieve the vintage look of early computer graphics.Processing libraries used included Ani, PeasyCam, Syphon and The MidiBus.

Project Page | Cyrill Studer

  • Amin Shahsavar

    Dude, the art direction and general look and feel of beat syncness in this video is off the hook. This deserves way more views!

  • Cyrill Studer

    Thanks a lot! :) Feel free to share it, I’d totally appreciate it!

  • Amin Shahsavar

    Will do! So the manipulation and movement of all shapes were done *live* by you through your MIDI controller? Or did you have some audio analysis and/or timeline syncing features? I’m interested in how you synced this so perfectly.

  • Cyrill Studer

    Yes, that was me on the MIDI controller. :) No computational audio analysis was used. But a lot of rehearsing and quite many takes were necessary to achieve the tight interplay with the music.