HOLO 2 – Aftermath

About a year ago HOLO 2 came rolling off the press and we’ve spent the last twelve months shipping it and presenting it all over the world. We compiled a pretty massive report that collates all the crucial facts, figures, and feedback we’ve received. Thanks to our readers, partners, and contributors alike for your support—HOLO is a tribute to the amazing communities it chronicles.

22/11/2017
CAN 2016 – Highlights and Favourites

At its best, creative inquiry offers intellectual nourishment, empowerment and solace. At the end of 2016, we need all of those, which is why remembering – and celebrating – the outstanding work done this year is all the more important. Over the past twelve months we’ve added more than 100 projects to our archive – and with your help we’ve selected the favourite ones!

24/12/2016
HOLO 2 – The Future is (Out) Now

From the paradoxical nature of our impending quantum (computing) future to the enduring mystery of the Big Bang – the ideas explored in HOLO 2 could not be any bigger. We think it shows.

23/11/2016
HOLO 2 – The Grand Tour

226 pages, 42 contributors, 22 features, HOLO 2 is ready to go to press: the magazine about emerging trajectories in art, science, and technology is back with another issue. Take a tour and order your copy at today.

11/12/2015
HOLO 2 – An Illustrated Countdown

The thrill of wrapping up! As HOLO 2 nears completion, a world of detail falls into place. Excited yet? Here are ten (more) reasons why we are. The restless (color coded) loop of featured artist Jürg Lehni’s Flood Fill – Clock (2009) shown above couldn’t capture the current, final, stage of magazine production any better.…

18/06/2015
HOLO 2 – Back to the (not-so-distant) future

Learn more about the making of HOLO 2. Featuring over 30 contributors from a dozen countries and a hefty 200 pages of premium print, HOLO returns and endeavours to be smarter, more substantive, and more special than our first issue.

11/02/2015
“Nature of Code” by Daniel Shiffman – Member Giveaway

Sorry, this is Members Only content. Please Log-in. Join us today by becoming a Member. Archive: More than 3,500 project profiles, scores of essays, interviews and reviews.Publish: Post your projects, events, announcements.No Ads: No advertisements, miners, banners.Education: Tutorials (beginners and advanced) with code examples, downloads.Jobs Archive: Find employers who have recruited here in the past…

21/02/2013

About a year ago HOLO 2 came rolling off the press and we’ve spent the last twelve months shipping it and presenting it all over the world. We compiled a pretty massive report that collates all the crucial facts, figures, and feedback we’ve received. Thanks to our readers, partners, and contributors alike for your support—HOLO is a tribute to the amazing communities it chronicles.

A meditation on several recent Troika projects that render cellular automata with dice and anodised aluminium rather than pixels on a screen. Realized over the last four years, these works demonstrate how a prolonged investigation into a rudimentary approach can yield rich dividends.

At its best, creative inquiry offers intellectual nourishment, empowerment and solace. At the end of 2016, we need all of those, which is why remembering – and celebrating – the outstanding work done this year is all the more important. Over the past twelve months we’ve added more than 100 projects to our archive – and with your help we’ve selected the favourite ones!

226 pages, 42 contributors, 22 features, HOLO 2 is ready to go to press: the magazine about emerging trajectories in art, science, and technology is back with another issue. Take a tour and order your copy at today.

The thrill of wrapping up! As HOLO 2 nears completion, a world of detail falls into place. Excited yet? Here are ten (more) reasons why we are. The restless (color coded) loop of featured artist Jürg Lehni’s Flood Fill – Clock (2009) shown above couldn’t capture the current, final, stage of magazine production any better.…

Learn more about the making of HOLO 2. Featuring over 30 contributors from a dozen countries and a hefty 200 pages of premium print, HOLO returns and endeavours to be smarter, more substantive, and more special than our first issue.

Visual instrument by Cyrill Studer and Lazar Jeremic for creating and controlling organically moving particles with a swarm behaviour.

Sorry, this is Members Only content. Please Log-in. Join us today by becoming a Member. Archive: More than 3,500 project profiles, scores of essays, interviews and reviews.Publish: Post your projects, events, announcements.No Ads: No advertisements, miners, banners.Education: Tutorials (beginners and advanced) with code examples, downloads.Jobs Archive: Find employers who have recruited here in the past…

Processing enthusiasts rejoice! There is a new book coming by Daniel Shiffman and it’s called Nature of Code. As it’s title implies this book takes phenomena that naturally occur in our physical world and shows you how to simulate them with code.

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